Mar/Apr 2009, Volume 33, No. 4
FEATURING
Jerry Martini, Peter Freeman, Frank Macchia
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ARTICLES THIS ISSUE
MarApr 2009


Creative Jazz Improvisation
by David Pope
"Prepping For College Jazz Auditions"

Musings On The Mouthpiece
"The Eternal & Incomprehensible Laws of the Universe"
Steve "Saxgourmet" Goodson

Rock 'n Roll Saxophone
by Andrew Clark
"Rock Ballad Tips & Techniques For Saxophone"

Repairing Your Saxophone
by Emilio Lyons "The Sax Doctor"
"How To Tighten Your Saxophone Neck Permanently"

Creative Teaching Techniques
by Steve Mauk
"Professional Stage Presence"

A Lesson With Branford Marsalis
by Greg Banaszak

New Saxophone Publications
by David Demsey
"Saxophone Basics by Dave Liebman & Mat Vashlishan"
"Elvin for unaccompanied sax by Dave Liebman"
"Sax Soneando book/cd by Javier Zalbe"
"Brazilian and Afro-Cuban Jazz Conception
by Fernando Brandao"

The Frankensax Part I
by Michael S Brockman
"An Experimental 12 octave Vent Saxophone"
RECOMMENDED RECORDINGS
Paul Wagner's Reviews
Six Species
Frost Saxophone Quartet

Serenade
Brian Horner

Billy Kerr's Reviews
50 Years Of Dave Brubeck
Paul Desmond, Gerry Mulligan, Bobby Militello
Roll With It
David Halliday
The Blues and the Abstract Truth Take 2
Bob Sheperd, Jeff Clayton,
Brian Scanlon, Bill Cunliffe



Frank Bongiorno's Reviews
Crossroads
Peter Sommer, Rich Perry
Invented Reality
Jasna Jovicevic

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Jazz Articulation Techniques
Masterclass/Play-Along CD
by Will Campbell

Articulation within the jazz style is often an elusive skill for saxophonists who have been trained exclusively in the “classical” tradition. Often these alternate methods of articulating seem contradictory to the conventional techniques that are taught to young musicians. In learning jazz, it is not uncommon for the student to focus on improvisation before he/she has a solid understanding of the dialectal differences between the classical and jazz musical languages. Without correctly molding the musical line through mature articulation, a theoretically advanced improvised solo will not sound nearly as mature as a simpler solo with proper articulation and phrasing. Mature articulation is also extremely important in section playing within a jazz ensemble. This article will demonstrate how a few simple exercises can allow young jazz saxophonists to play with a more mature jazz concept through better articulation.

JAZZ ARTICULATION TECHNIQUES:
FOR THE MATURING SAXOPHONIST

Master Class CD track information
Track Title
1. Introduction and discussion of the scoop (2:09)
2. Incorrect interpretation of Example 1 and discussion (:25)
3. Example 2 and discussion (:27)
4. Example 3 and discussion (:32)
5. Example 4 and discussion (:26)
6. Example 5 and discussion (1:13)
7. Example 7 and discussion (:22)
8. Example 8 and discussion (:26)
9. Example 9 and discussion (:13)
10. Example 8A and discussion (1:02)
11. Example 12 and discussion (:21)
12. Example 11 and discussion (:47)
13. Example 13 and discussion (1:05)
14. Example 14 and discussion (:37)
15. Example 15 and discussion (:27)
16. Example 16 and discussion (1:32)
17. Example 17, discussion, and conclusion (1:06)
18. Articulation Etude #1 complete performance (1:37)
19. Articulation Etude #1 play-along without saxophone (1:35)
20. Articulation Etude #2 complete performance (1:07)
21. Articulation Etude #2 play-along saxophone (1:06)
22. Articulation Etude #3 complete performance (1:06)
23. Articulation Etude #3 play-along without saxophone (1:05)
Total Time 20:56
CD recorded at Acoustic Barn Studios