JanFeb 2010, Volume 34, No. 3
FEATURING
Ronnie Laws, Jessy J, Simon Haram
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ARTICLES THIS ISSUE
JanFeb 2010

Emilio Lyons "The Sax Doctor"
"Fixing Leaky Pads, Replacing Mother Of Pearl on Keys "
by Emilio Lyons

The Saxophone Quartet
by Susan Fancher
"The H2 Saxophone Quartet"

A Lesson With Dave Pietro
by Greg Banaszak

Rock 'n Roll Saxophone
by Andrew Clark
"A Simple Blues Etude For Alto Sax"

The Rites Of Springs
by Steve Goodson
"Everything You Need To Know About Sax Key Springs"

Creative Jazz Improvisation
by David Pope
"Online Networking For Jazz Musicians"
New Saxophone Publications
by David Demsey
"Pastoral Landscape for Bb sax"
"Real Easy Book, Vol 3: A Short History Of Jazz"

RECOMMENDED RECORDINGS
Paul Wagner's Reviews
In Friendship
James Romain

Tangled Loops
Nathan Nabb

Billy Kerr's Reviews
Declaration
Donny McCaslin
The Comets Tail: Compositions of Mike Brecker
Chuck Owen
Dedication
Ralph Bowen


Frank Bongiorno's Reviews
Coming Together
Chris Potter
Winter Fruits
Laren Stillman

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Mozart "Dissonance" Quartet in C Major
transcribed by David Camwell for saxophone quartet

Masterclass/Play-Along CD
by David Camwell

Although Mozart had previously written a set of six quartets (K. 168-73), his most celebrated set of string quartets was composed in Vienna, and dedicated in 1781 to his friend and colleague, Franz Joseph Haydn. Unlike most of his commission-based works, these quartets were composed over four years as an homage to Haydn and all highly knowledgeable musicians. Mozart spent an unusual amount of time on their development, which is apparent by the many markings on the original autographs; very few other works by Mozart show as many erasure marks, improvements, and discarded ideas as this set of quartets.
The “Dissonance” Quartet in C Major, K. 465, was the last of the six quartets dedicated to Haydn, receiving its nickname from the highly unusual Adagio introduction to the first movement. The work begins with repeated eighth-notes in the cello part, with the other three parts then entering in a staggered formation.

“Dissonance” Quartet in C Major, K. 465
For Saxophone Quartet
Saxophone Journal Masterclass CD

by David Camwell
TRACK TITLE
1 Introduction
2 Technical Demands
3 Long Short Exercise
4 Short Long Exercise
5 Normal Line
6 Adagio (soprano sax play-along)
7 Allegro (soprano sax play-along)
8 Adagio (complete performance)
9 Allegro (complete performance)